Oil Painting for Beginners – Safety and Products | Summary of Information Related to how long for oil painting to dry

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Oil Painting for Beginners - Safety and Products

Oil Painting for Beginners – Safety and Products


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Many people do not want to give oil painting a try for fear of toxicity. But there is a common misconception in saying that oil paint is toxic. The practice of oil painting without proper care can indeed be unsafe, but the danger doesn’t come from the paint itself. It is very important to understand exactly what is dangerous and what’s not.

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About me (bio) :

I am an artist living and working in France. I learned the techniques of the Atelier of the Nineteenth century and now I try to share some of my knowledge with the rest of the world, because I think that beauty still has an important role to play in artistic creation. I do mostly drawing and oil painting, and my goal is always to provide techniques and explanations that can be useful to anyone, from beginners to more advanced artists.

The material I use most of the time (not necessarily in this video) :

Drawing
Equipement
✓ Kneaded eraser
✓ Plumb line
✓ Small mirror
✓ An old synthetic brush
✓ Masking tape
✓ Cutter
✓ Sandpaper or sanding block
✓ Mahlstick or Hand rest (DIY)
✓ Level ruler
Graphite
✓ Pencils 2H, HB and 2B
Charcoal
✓ If available: Nitram charcoals (H, HB and B)
!!! Or, if not::
✓ Square Venetian charcoals Lefranc and Bourgeois
✓ Natural charcoal box (check that the heart of the stick is not spongy and hollow)
Black and white chalk
✓ Sketch pencil Conté white
✓ Square Conté noir : HB and 2B
✓ Chalk or pencil holder
✓ Pencil sketch Conté Pierre noire : H and HB
Sanguine
✓ Sketch pencil Conté : Blood and blood Medici
✓ Crayon Polychromos Faber-Castel : sanguine
✓ Sketch pencil Conté white
Oil painting
Palette
(Extra-fine paint, recommended brands according to availability: Lefranc Bourgeois, Winsor and Newton, Royal Talens Rembrandt, Sennelier)
✓ Titanium white PW6
✓ Yellow ochre PY42
✓ Burnt Sienna PR101 or PBr7
✓ Venetian red or English red PR101
✓ Permanent Alizarin crimson (Attention: do not use the traditional pigment, which is not very light-fast) PV19 or PR177
✓ Cobalt teal blue PG50
✓ French ultramarine blue PB29
✓ Raw umber PBr7
✓ Burnt umber PBr7
✓ Ivory Black PBk9
Brushes
✓ About ten filbert hog bristle brushes sizes n° 4, 6, 8, 10 and 12
✓ Some flat brushes
✓ Round sable brush or round Kolinsky sable n°10 (from the size of the nail (about one inch) or synthetic imitation
Medium
✓ Linseed stand oil
✓ Odourless mineral spirits
✓ Safflower oil
Surface
✓ Linen canvas, fine grain universal coating
✓ Canson oil-acrylic oil paper Figueras
Others
✓ Palette
✓ Foam and spalter brushes
✓ Palette knife in the shape of a water drop
✓ A few small pots, containers, jars…
✓ Paper towels

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Oil Painting for Beginners – Safety and Products.

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48 comments

Coffee Pot 29/08/2021 - 16:41

Overly long video just to explain these points in my opinion.

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hannehanne art 29/08/2021 - 16:41

Thank you! Subscribed. 😀

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Fola Abraham 29/08/2021 - 16:41

A year ago I made a painting with oil…noticed just few weeks ago that it's beginning to form soapy foams all over the surface,how do I fix this please ?

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Daniel Arnold 29/08/2021 - 16:41

THIS is the video i needed! Amazing as always

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Jennifer Cinquini 29/08/2021 - 16:41

Amazing video thanks!!! I use only Linseed Oil with Windsor and Newton primary colors (titanium white, cadmium yellow / red, ultramarine blue). I have no solvents. Is this toxic at all? My studio is not ventilated. Thanks so much!!!

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Meiscy Dimaano 29/08/2021 - 16:41

Thank you! Much appreciated♥♥♥

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Jean-Baptiste ROBERT 29/08/2021 - 16:41

Merci Florent pour la vidéo. As-tu testé les diluant sennelier écologique (green for oil diluant or medium)?
Apparemment, les utilisateurs se plaignent d'un temps de séchage extrêmement rallongé. Sur certains site web, il est mentionné qu'il faut en mettre très peut, or pour la première couche je suppose qu'il faut quand même mettre une bonne quantité (afin d'avoir une couche très maigre)?
Voilà si tu as un avis et un retour d'expérience ça m'intéresse.
Autre question, habituellement lorsque tu fais ta première couche, quel ratio peinture/solvent utilises-tu? 50/50?

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Lampa 29/08/2021 - 16:41

I paint in my garage. It is a ventilated area, but of course not as outside. Do you believe it is enough for using solvents?

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Tyzon 666 29/08/2021 - 16:41

It´s just look to tasty you know painting a hamburger then it´s hard not to take a bite or two mmhh

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Trysten Silver 29/08/2021 - 16:41

Walnut can also combust.

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Michael Gates 29/08/2021 - 16:41

I'm intrigued by the frequent appearance of products with Finnish labeling in your videos, such as the metal container at 4:30 (labelled "TURPENTINE – ODORLESS", whatever that means). Do you visit often or just happen to order from a Finnish supplier? Somewhat related, I happen to live in Finland, and as a beginner, I've been having trouble trying to buy the products I'm looking for, because the labels and descriptions are confusing, and often difficult to associate with the English names found in most online sources for these products. I could not, for example, identify what you call "stand oil" from the myriad of bottles available in the art store I've been visiting, as nothing was labelled as such or anything easily related to it. Yet it must have been there, since it's a specialty store.

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Kardoffl 29/08/2021 - 16:41

That helps a lot. Many thanks!

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lurklingX 29/08/2021 - 16:41

Thank you this was SO HELPFUL! I heard about the combustion problem in somebody else’s video, and that had me so worried about fire hazards. 🔥 I had to stop and look around for a reasonable and informative video. Yours hit all the marks and even some things I didn’t know that I needed to know. (there’s a surprising number of people on YouTube that obviously are brand new, and also treat their channel like total social media. So it’s a little frustrating to try and comb through all of it for real channels like yours, and draw mix paint, etc. I appreciate you!)

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Sable Moreno 29/08/2021 - 16:41

One question: another video I watched had said that the rags were ok to stay out as long as they're laid out completely flat on something like a ceramic dish or a metal container to avoid area directly surrounding the rag getting too hot from the oxidation and spontaneously combusting. (I forget exactly if that applied only to oil or if it applied to mediums and solvents as well) Is that the reason you're saying for them to be put into a bin, or is it more to do with fumes they give off?
Asking mainly since I'm planning on getting into oils and the spaces I'm going to be working in (a storage shed made studio and my room) are OK in ventilation, but I have pets nearby in the room across from me, so if its a fume thing I dont want to risk them getting sick.

The color on the rag or paper instead of the solvent container is how i do my watercolor anyway so it'll be an easy shift when I start oils. I found that at a certain point by brushes stopped getting cleaned between colors and would hold on to the discolored water WAY too much since the pigment was so heavily concentrated. I just wipe, rinse in the water, wipe again, then into clean water so my other colors aren't mixed (since its usually like a blue to a yellow color or something)

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Kai Stinks 29/08/2021 - 16:41

Does the solvent turn yellow? CUz mines clear and I haven't used it yet. Or is it just different solvents?

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Mike Keyes 29/08/2021 - 16:41

Brilliant, clear, and essential advice.

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Shahzad Qurashi 29/08/2021 - 16:41

Very nice

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Erin Moore 29/08/2021 - 16:41

this was a lot of information. thank you for it.

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sue massey 29/08/2021 - 16:41

Very, very helpful. Thank you.

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slimeyflowers 29/08/2021 - 16:41

thank you for this video! im stressed out about using oil paints poorly but i feel much safer knowing that i can paint safely

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Anna Δανα 29/08/2021 - 16:41

Although there are films of famous artists doing it, please guys don't smoke while oil painting.

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Miguel Garcia 29/08/2021 - 16:41

Thank you! I still have a question: how do I clean up a table safely if I accidentally drop oil painting medium on it?

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AboutWhat 29/08/2021 - 16:41

Note that most water soluable paints are not meant to be thinned down with water – they sell special mediums for these if you don't like to use solvent. The main advantage of this paint is that they can be cleaned without solvent which is where the most fumes are evaporating – just remember Bob Ross beating the devil.

Also want to point out that for me personally odorless mineral spirits are far more dangerous, because you have no perception of the fumes around you.
You would never stay in a room full of fumes of mineral spirits longer than you have to, but as you don't smell the odorless one there is a possiblity to get a higer dose.

I personally like to use real gum turpentine as it's also perceptable but has a nice pinetree smell, it's still toxic though.

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Julie 29/08/2021 - 16:41

Aw man

(1) These videos are so helpful!
(2) You have a very pleasant voice.
(3) Your pictures are beautiful and diverse, and really inspiring.
(4) Your surname means "colored" in Norwegian. As in 'something that is being colored.'
(5) You're so pretty

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Andy Pandy 29/08/2021 - 16:41

what do you do with dirty napkins/rags? can you clean the rags or throw them away in a normal trash or should it be taken away to be disposed with the solvent

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Alrighty then 29/08/2021 - 16:41

What kinds of oils can you use to make the paint more fluid/ to thin it out? Can I f.e. use sunflower oil or does that not polymerize like lineseed oil (I don't know if that's necessary for the paint?)

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Nokia 29/08/2021 - 16:41

For solvents I recommend gamsol it is used for teaching and a lot of artists use it and it is non- toxic

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Nokia 29/08/2021 - 16:41

I’m starting tomorrow as waiting for them to arrive this was so helpful

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Olov Sandberg 29/08/2021 - 16:41

If you use a rag for cleaning brushes while painting, how do you then clean the rag?

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peekaboo16 29/08/2021 - 16:41

Just bought your 7 hrs course and can't wait to start 😀

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Laura Siffrin Art 29/08/2021 - 16:41

How safe is lavender spike oil? It claims it is non toxic and safe. Any thoughts? Love all your informational video's thankyou!

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À nos crayons ! 29/08/2021 - 16:41

Super vidéo, c’est hyper dur de trouver toutes ces informations, et d’avoir une version cohérente sur ces sujets, ça va aider beauuuucoup de monde j’en suis sure !

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Drift Stix RC 29/08/2021 - 16:41

What brand of oil paint do you use ? I see you were on the Winton Newton website !

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Pe. G 29/08/2021 - 16:41

A lovely and very informative video again! Thanks a lot, Florent, for all your help with my painting. I really love to watch your excellent videos!

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some artist 29/08/2021 - 16:41

i live in a little room. i eat there, i sleep there, etc. so… can i paint in my room with oil paints?

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Luis Lizarralde 29/08/2021 - 16:41

Why did you stop making videos in french do you have other channel in french?

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Kavita Bhandari Arts 29/08/2021 - 16:41

Thanks. Very helpful

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Vladimir Orlov 29/08/2021 - 16:41

🙂🤔👀👍💻🖌🎨🎨🎨

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Dania Hamweih 29/08/2021 - 16:41

My reasons why I LOVE your channel:
Informative
Inspiring
Helpful
Great for all levels
Thank you for putting in effort and time to create such content😍😍😍

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Jasmine Rose Du Feu 29/08/2021 - 16:41

My room is not well ventilated, all of my windows dont open properly. I dont have anywhere to go like a garage, I dont rent out a studio. What would you recommend I do?

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Mystery McCarthy 29/08/2021 - 16:41

I have heard that the citrus based solvents don't preform well, so I haven't wanted to bother trying them. Wondering, have you or anybody tried spike lavender oil as a medium? I have heard good things about it. I am thinking of trying it myself. I would like to try to use it to create my Imprimatura layer. Since I am no longer using solvents, I have been dry brushing this burnt umber layer on very very thinly, it is fine, but it is hard work to achieve an even layer and even harder on my poor brushes!
I made the choice to go solvent free for a couple years now, and it is working much better then I ever imagined. I clean my palette and brushes with oil and it works amazingly well, just plain cooking oil. My brushes are in condition because of it. When painting I use these solvent free mediums: Oleogel, Linseed Oil, and Gamblin Solvent Free Medium. The only hazardous product I still use is my Gamblin varnish, because there seems to be no less harmful varnish available, maybe one day. I agree with using varnish outside, the fumes are just too nasty for indoors.

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Nae Dolor 29/08/2021 - 16:41

Titanium white is very good as a general strong white but it is chalky and makes colors dull. When it comes to glazing, there is no substitute for lead white. Don't eat it, don't smear it on your face, wear gloves and you will be fine. Painters like Titian, Monet, Michelangelo lived very long lives and they used lead white extensively.

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Sally Jo M-Cooper 29/08/2021 - 16:41

Not related to this video. Thank you for promoting classical knowledge in painting, I attempted to get it at university and could not, ended up doing metalsmithing because it was at least teaching skills. Glad to find you now. Glad you are talking about this deficit in knowledge in the Visual arts. Hopefully via alternative media artists can turn the ship around.

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Zoe Hitchhikes 29/08/2021 - 16:41

Thank you so much for all this information! It really bothers me that people just call oil painting toxic without explaining exactly what they mean by that. I really like that you explain and discuss alternatives as well! I really want to try it out myself, but i feel like I need dedicated space for it that can be well ventilated and where I can leave stuff around to dry.

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Lili Dzholi 29/08/2021 - 16:41

It is simple: just don’t eat paints!

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am ab 29/08/2021 - 16:41

Salut Florent, est-ce que tu aurais un lien ou une référence pour les droppers en plastique souple? Merci!

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Rachel Pieters 29/08/2021 - 16:41

I wish this video was around when I put on my brave cap and began learning to oil paint last year. I was terrified of all I had heard, and it was a real challenge to find all of this information, which I had to track down separately, and it took a really long time. In the end, it wasn't so scary after all, and I absolutely love it. I was extremely frustrated painting with acrylics, and the unique properties of oil was exactly what I had been looking for. Even still, I've always been worried about the disposal of my painting rags, and I went through numerous types of containers to figure out how to store and drip my mediums one drop at a time, so thank you for including that information. This video is a godsend for anyone scared to, or just learning how to, oil paint. Excellent advice, all the way around. Thank you!

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Madanelainart 2 29/08/2021 - 16:41

Thank you, very useful.

Reply

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